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New technology could put political marketing messages where canvassers can't go during this election season— right in your pocket while you're waiting in line at the polls.

A young mother standing in line to vote who pulls out her iPhone to browse through Facebook might see a custom campaign ad aimed squarely at people matching her demographic at just that location. Or she could receive a text message reminding her of the name of a candidate in a down-ballot race for the Legislature or Congress when her car pulls into the parking lot of a designated polling location.

Micro-targeting messages to motivate voters in this year's elections has made leaps-and-bounds advancements from the days of voter outreach being limited to television sets, mail, and even robocalls. Campaigns, just like business marketers, are breaking new ground in using the technology called "geofencing" to deliver digital ads to people in areas as specific as a church or a school.

Political campaigns also are buying information on voters from telecommunication and marketing companies that sell their customers' cell phone-generated location data that can be mined to determine where they shop, work, play and pray. Campaigns use the information to create profiles of voters who might share their political philosophies and public policy issues they care about like health care, education, and roads.

Geofences can be drawn as small as the property boundaries of a school, library or church used for a polling precinct. With geofenced digital advertising zones, you can start to showcase last-minute ads that are incredibly relevant to what you're trying to make a push on.

As voters cut their cable cords or mute their television sets during the barrage of political advertising in this year's record-breaking spending binge, campaigns have turned to different digital media to both identify and reach voters.

Geofencing is much more efficient than blanketing a neighborhood with fliers. You can target specific messages to people rather than doing the old Gatling gun where you spread messages across an entire group and see what hits. 

Get a QUOTE and add a geofence campaign to your campaign today.